Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Radio Lab: Moment

Some video content from my all time favorite radio program: Radio Lab. Now if only they would give me a job. Then again, considering my screed of a cover letter, I wouldn't hire me either. I still love you Radio Lab.

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Favorite Work

Of course, there's also the cut/fold diagram, the plywood site model of the high line, and the mangled, safety-pin tux. They're like my children. I love them all.

Sunday, August 09, 2009

Intro to Arch: Done

With mixed emotions I'm here to say that my 5 week exploration into architecture has come to an end. Not that I won't be glad to do something other than spend 14 hours in the studio every day, but something really great and perhaps indescribable happened in my time at Columbia. Maybe it's because I've started to find a career path that really excites me, or maybe it's that I've worked harder than I've ever worked before and I love it, or maybe it's the amazing people I met in the program. In any case, I could start an MArch program tomorrow and be happy.

I'm now out of the dorms and living in my TA's room while he is out traveling for the next month and will start my mad scramble for a job on Monday.

One more not on the Arch program. We had a final party on Friday where everyone pinned up their best work. It really was an inspiring event. Here is most of my final project (minus the model I made in chipboard). The assignment was to make a dual purpose building that incorporated a tailor shop and another program of our choosing. We could only use 600 sq. ft. of surface area for the whole building and we had to incorporate a model we made previously that was based on a man's suit we mangled to mimic the movements of a transformer toy. So to recap the progression: transformer, man's suit, abstract model, tailor shop. Yeah...pretty nuts.

My project is about the realization of form and space through folds. I fashioned my building (a kimono tailor and tea house) out of a single folded piece of paper. There are no freestanding elements and nothing that needed to be glued together. On the right side there is a diagram of how forms arise from folding. In the middle is a diagram of the flattened piece of paper that became my model. At the top is a one-point perspective of my building on the site (the High Line), and at the bottom is a isometric projection of my building. I'll get a pic of the actual model online ASAP.